FF Meta® font family


Designed by  Erik Spiekermann in 1991
One of the most famous and popular typefaces of the FontFont library is Meta®, designed by Erik Spiekermann. Since 1991, when the first styles were published, the font has developed into a super family with numerous variants.The basic shape of FF Meta is based on Renaissance Antiqua and has a corresponding, slight variation in the stroke width. Beveled stroke ends and the partially curved lines in particular lend Meta a distinctive, lively and friendly character, which is further supported by the round points. The two-story "g", which is very striking and has become a kind of trademark of the font, was adapted from the Antiqua. Meta is also perfectly legible in the small font sizes, not in the least because of the large x-height and open letter forms. FF Meta is now available in two widths with six condensed weights and eight normal weights. All styles have a true italic with their own letter forms and are perfectly equipped typographically. You have the option of small capitals, different number sets, numerous and in some cases very particular ligatures and alternate characters.If the vivid and detailed structures of FF Meta prove to be a little too dominant in headlines and larger font sizes, FF Meta® Headline is the ideal choice. Under the direction of Erik Spiekermann and Christian Schwartz, Joshua Darden designed three widths, each with four weights for the compact font, optimizing it for larger sizes. To this end, he not only cut back the curved lines, but also shortened slightly the descenders and reduced the letter-spacing. Alternate characters with a reduced form for "a", "g" and "l" offer you more leeway.FF Meta® Correspondence is designed specifically for the requirements of the office environment. Not only did a few letters get a more solid form, such as the lowercase "i" and "j" or the uppercase "I" and "Q", but other characters, such as "f", "E" and "F", have been optimized for better screen display, dispensing with the oblique ends. The small "g" is available in the single-story form, although the two-story version, typical to the Meta font, is also included. FF Meta Correspondence also contains numerous symbols and pictograms for everyday office work.It took Erik Spiekermann, collaborating with Christian Schwartz and Kris Sowersby, three years to design FF Meta® Serif. The approach was not to cling obsessively to the basic shape of FF Meta, but rather to create a serif that was fitting for the font. As a result, the Renaissance Antiqua FF Meta Serif is in perfect harmony with FF Meta in terms of its weights and x-height. It embraces the style of its sister font so as to be optically perfect, not mathematically exact. All six weights of FF Meta Serif Italic feature real italic styles and can be combined with the FF Meta on the same page or in the same line.

FF Meta Hairline

Desktop fonts are designed to be installed on a computer for use with applications. Licensed per computer.
Web fonts are used with the CSS @font-face rule. They are licensed for a set number of page views with no time limitation.
Web fonts are used with the CSS rule @font-face used. The license has no time limit.
Mobile App Fonts can be embedded in your mobile application. Each app requires a separate license. The license is based on the number of app installations.
Electronic Publication Fonts can be embedded in an eBook, eMagazine or eNewspaper. Fonts are licensed per issue.
Server fonts can be installed on a server and e.g. used by automated processes to create items. A license is per server core CPU per year.
You can use this type of license to embed web fonts in digital ads, such as ads created in HTML5. The licenses are valid for a specific number of ad impressions without time limit.
FF Meta


world-map map

Std / OT CFF

supports at least

21 languages.















Technical details
OpenType outline flavour:
CFF - PostScript-Outlines
Technical font names:
File name: FontFont Installation Guides.pdf, MetaOT-Hair.otf, MetaProHair-InfoGuide.pdf, MetaProHair-SpecSheet.pdf
Windows menu name: MetaOT-Hair
PostScript name: MetaOT-Hair
PostScript full name: MetaOT-Hair
Catalog number:
167375408
Characters:
496
65.45 incl. VAT
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Features

Languages

Case-Sensitive Forms

Tag: case

Function: Shifts various punctuation marks up to a position that works better with all-capital sequences or sets of lining figures; also changes oldstyle figures to lining figures. By default, glyphs in a text face are designed to work with lowercase characters. Some characters should be shifted vertically to fit the higher visual center of all-capital or lining text. Also, lining figures are the same height (or close to it) as capitals, and fit much better with all-capital text. The user selects a block of text and applies this feature. The dashes, bracketing characters, guillemet quotes and the like shift up to match the capitals, and oldstyle figures change to lining figures.

Denominators

Tag: dnom

Function: Replaces selected figures which follow a slash with denominator figures. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 17 into denominators when the user applies the fraction feature.

Fractions

Tag: frac

Function: Replaces figures separated by a slash with 'common' (diagonal) fractions. The user enters 3/4 in a recipe and gets the threequarters fraction.

Standard Ligatures

Tag: liga

Function: Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a single glyph which is preferred for typographic purposes. This feature covers the ligatures which the designer/manufacturer judges should be used in normal conditions. The glyph for ffl replaces the sequence of glyphs f f l.

Lining Figures

Tag: lnum

Function: This feature changes selected figures from oldstyle to the default lining form. The user invokes this feature in order to get lining figures, which fit better with all-capital text. Various characters designed to be used with figures may also be covered by this feature. In cases where lining figures are the default form, this feature would undo previous substitutions.

Numerators

Tag: numr

Function: Replaces selected figures which precede a slash with numerator figures, and replaces the typographic slash with the fraction slash. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 11 into numerators, and the slash into a fraction slash when the user applies the fraction feature.

Ordinals

Tag: ordn

Function: Replaces default alphabetic glyphs with the corresponding ordinal forms for use after figures. One exception to the follows-a-figure rule is the numero character (U+2116), which is actually a ligature substitution, but is best accessed through this feature. The user applies this feature to turn 2.o into 2.o (abbreviation for secundo).

Proportional Figures

Tag: pnum

Function: Replaces figure glyphs set on uniform (tabular) widths with corresponding glyphs set on glyph-specific (proportional) widths. Tabular widths will generally be the default, but this cannot be safely assumed. Of course this feature would not be present in monospaced designs. The user may apply this feature to get even spacing for lining figures used as dates in an all-cap headline.

Scientific Inferiors

Tag: sinf

Function: Replaces lining or oldstyle figures with inferior figures (smaller glyphs which sit lower than the standard baseline, primarily for chemical or mathematical notation). May also replace lowercase characters with alphabetic inferiors. The application can use this feature to automatically access the inferior figures (more legible than scaled figures).

Superscript

Tag: sups

Function: Replaces lining or oldstyle figures with superior figures (primarily for footnote indication), and replaces lowercase letters with superior letters (primarily for abbreviated French titles). The application can use this feature to automatically access the superior figures (more legible than scaled figures) for footnotes, or the user can apply it to Mssr to get the classic form.

Tabular Figures

Tag: tnum

Function: Replaces figure glyphs set on proportional widths with corresponding glyphs set on uniform (tabular) widths. Tabular widths will generally be the default, but this cannot be safely assumed. Of course this feature would not be present in monospaced designs. The user may apply this feature to get oldstyle figures to align vertically in a column.

Contextual Alternates

Tag: calt

Function: In specified situations, replaces default glyphs with alternate forms which provide better joining behavior. Used in script typefaces which are designed to have some or all of their glyphs join. In Caflisch Script, o is replaced by o.alt2 when followed by an ascending letterform.

Stylistic Alternates

Tag: salt

Function: Many fonts contain alternate glyph designs for a purely esthetic effect; these don't always fit into a clear category like swash or historical. As in the case of swash glyphs, there may be more than one alternate form. This feature replaces the default forms with the stylistic alternates. The user applies this feature to Industria to get the alternate form of g.

Historical Forms

Tag: hist

Function: Some letterforms were in common use in the past, but appear anachronistic today. The best-known example is the long form of s; others would include the old Fraktur k. Some fonts include the historical forms as alternates, so they can be used for a 'period' effect. This feature replaces the default (current) forms with the historical alternates. While some ligatures are also used for historical effect, this feature deals only with single characters. The user applies this feature in Adobe Jenson to get the archaic forms of M, Q and Z.

Subscript

Tag: subs

Function: The "subs" feature may replace a default glyph with a subscript glyph, or it may combine a glyph substitution with positioning adjustments for proper placement. Recommended implementation: First, a single or contextual substitution lookup implements the subscript glyph (GSUB lookup type 1). Then, if the glyph needs repositioning, an application may apply a single adjustment, pair adjustment, or contextual adjustment positioning lookup to modify its position.

Ornaments

Tag: ornm

Function: This is a dual-function feature, which uses two input methods to give the user access to ornament glyphs (e.g. fleurons, dingbats and border elements) in the font. One method replaces the bullet character with a selection from the full set of available ornaments; the other replaces specific "lower ASCII" characters with ornaments assigned to them. The first approach supports the general or browsing user; the second supports the power user. The user inputs qwwwwwwwwwe to form the top of a flourished box in Adobe Caslon, or inputs the bullet character, then chooses the thistle dingbat.

Discretionary Ligatures

Tag: dlig

Function: Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a single glyph which is preferred for typographic purposes. This feature covers those ligatures which may be used for special effect, at the user's preference. The glyph for ct replaces the sequence of glyphs c t, or U+322E (Kanji ligature for "Friday") replaces the sequence U+91D1 U+66DC U+65E5.

Sylistic Set 1

Tag: ss01

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

Sylistic Set 2

Tag: ss02

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

These fonts support the Basic Latin character set. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in d

Tag: Basic Latin

Function: These fonts support the Basic Latin character set. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.