General Questions

1. What forms of use are permitted?

2. What forms of use require extended licensing?

3. Can Web pages using Web fonts be printed?

4. How can I tell if a font is available as a Web Font?

5. Will more fonts be added?

6. What languages do the Web fonts support?

7. What browsers are supported?

8. What is WOFF 2.0?

9. Does Linotype Web fonts require use of Javascript?

10. What kind of technical support is provided?

11. What difference does it make if I have live text as opposed to making my text out of graphic files?

12. Why do I need to choose between a desktop font and a webfont? What’s the difference?

13. Do I now need to buy a webfont license because I used a font I bought from you to make a logo for a website/graphic page headers/navigation buttons?

14. Why can’t I use a font I have already purchased from you in my website design?

15. How does licensing work for specifying fonts in a client’s website? Do they need to make the purchase?

16. If I’ve acquired fonts with the "Pay as you go” license model, how do I know if I need to upgrade my quota for page views?

17. Is it possible to acquire more page views?

18. On Linotype.com, what fonts are available in the “Pay as you go" license model and which fonts in the “Pay once" model?



1. What forms of use are permitted?
Through Linotype.com Web fonts, users can change the fonts on any website, blog, or social media website that allows HTML customization.


2. What forms of use require extended licensing?
Use of the Web Font Software:
1.on workstations within your organization (with the exception of use solely for Permitted Internal Use on the number of Workstations indicated in a Professional Tier account
2.as part of or in conjunction with any Application
3. for Editing
4. in a Commercial Product, requires extended licensing.


3. Can Web pages using Web fonts be printed?
Visitors may print pages that use Linotype.com Web fonts just as they would with other Web pages. Printing of Web fonts is dependent on browser support, and may vary from browser to browser.


4. How can I tell if a font is available as a Web Font?
There are various ways to determine whether a particular font is also available as a Web font. For example, look for the Web font tab on our Family and Product pages next to the desktop font tab. Additionally, our font search has a “Font format” option that allows you to choose between “Desktop” and “Web”.



5. Will more fonts be added?
Absolutely. We will continue to grow the selection of Web fonts by adding the collections of popular foundries and by releasing additional fonts from our own Monotype®, ITC®, Linotype® collections.


6. What languages do the Web fonts support?
All languages supported by your Web font selection are shown in its page view license. To view the languages supported by a Web font, use the “Language” drop-down menu on our Family and Product pages. In addition to the “Basic Latin” language version of your font, your downloaded Web Font Kit will include other supported variants, such as “Arabic” or “Cyrillic”.
We offer fonts to support Latin/European languages, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Cyrillic (Russian), Thai, Arabic, and Hebrew. Additional language support will be added in the future.
Basic Latin fonts support the following languages:
Afrikaans, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Gaelic, German, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Saami, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish.
Latin Extended 1 fonts support the following languages:
Afrikaans, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Gaelic, German, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Saami, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Croatian, Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Romanian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Turkish.


7. What browsers are supported?
Our Web fonts are officially supported by the following browsers:
Microsoft® Internet Explorer® v4 and above
Apple® Webkit/Safari® v3.1 and above
Mobile Safari, all versions = (for iPhone®, iPad®, iPod® devices)
Mozilla® Firefox® v3.5 and above
Google Chrome™ v4.0 and above
Opera™ v10.10 and above


8. What is WOFF 2.0?
WOFF 2.0 is an update to the most popular webfont format, WOFF (Web Open Font Format). WOFF 2.0 especially improves the data compression, allowing webpages using such web fonts to become significantly faster. All web fonts on Linotype.com are available as WOFF 2.0. Customers who already purchased can get a free update. For more information on WOFF 2.0 simply click here.


9. Does Linotype Web fonts require use of Javascript?
No. The usual method to enable font delivery uses a CSS file with @font-face declarations where no Javascript is involved. If you have licensed web fonts using the "Pay as you go" option, we offer two solutions for tracking page views: The first involves linking directly to an external CSS file hosted on our CDN. However, to reduce the potential of delays in page load time, we offer another solution based on calling the same external tracking URL using an asynchronous JavaScript function. Learn more about adding Web fonts to your site.


10. What kind of technical support is provided?
We provide technical support via email. Contact us using the Support Contact Information page on Linotype.com, or at [email protected]. We aim to respond to all email inquiries within one business day.


11. What difference does it make if I have live text as opposed to making my text out of graphic files?
You can make your entire website out of a single bitmap graphic if you wish, but it is very difficult to submit it to search engines, scale it for different browsers and devices, allow the user to print it, and make easy updates or changes, among other things. Websites made from a single graphic file do exist, but they are rare and generally perform poorly. Normally, people compromise by having some elements within their design as live text, and some – often menu bars, buttons, and headers – as fixed size graphic files. Using Web fonts means you can keep those parts of your design that would have otherwise been converted into graphics as live text. Using real text is preferable because it has huge advantages for accessibility. Sight-impaired visitors will be able to have more of your site read by screen-reader technology, and search engines will be able to index more of your page, interpreting the relative importance of text by HTML tags such as <h1>.


12. Why do I need to choose between a desktop font and a Web font? What’s the difference?
“Desktop” fonts are the TrueType, OpenType and PostScript fonts that you’ve been using on your computer for years. These are installed locally in your system’s fonts folder, and you use them in your word processor, design programs, etc.
“Webfonts” are the same fonts encoded in different ways, giving Web developers the ability to design sites using the fonts of their choice. Browsers (e.g. Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari) know how to download these fonts and use them to display Web pages as the designer intended. At purchase time, you can decide whether you need a Desktop license, a Web font license, or both. For example, if you will only be using a font on websites, and don’t need to use it in desktop applications such as Word or Photoshop, you would only need a Web font license.


13. Do I now need to buy a Web font license because I used a font I bought from you to make a logo for a website/graphic page headers/navigation buttons?
No, so long as they’re not live text. Your original license permits you to use the font on your computer within any application that supports font selection, including the graphic applications you use to make menu bars or header elements.


14. Why can’t I use a font I have already purchased from you in my website design?
There are two reasons: first, the license you agreed to on purchase only licensed the font for your own personal use (or that of employees at your company, etc.). Web fonts involve hosting fonts on a public server where they must be accessed by anyone viewing your website, which requires a new license.
Second, formatting fonts for the Web and screen is a complicated task, given the wide variety of ways that Web browsers and operating systems interpret the data built into your font file. Our Web font packages automate much of that compatibility work.


15. How does licensing work for specifying fonts in a client’s website? Do they need to make the purchase?
No. The specified name for the web font licenses does not need to match the name of the domain owner. You can specify separate licenses.


16. How will I know when I need to upgrade to more pageviews?
The style sheet included in our Web font kits includes a pageview counter. You will receive a notification from us when you are close to exceeding your pageview limit.



17. Is it possible to acquire more page views?
When you license fonts with the “Pay as you go” model, you need to acquire further licenses as soon as the selected number of page views is used up.
If you have acquired fonts with the “Pay once” model, you need to get additional licenses as soon as the amount of monthly page views exceeds the licensed number of monthly page views.
For both license models, you only need to get more licenses, there is no need for technical adjustments.


18. On Linotype.com, what fonts are available in the “Pay as you go" license model and which fonts in the “Pay once" model?
You can get all our original libraries with the "Pay as you go" license model on Linotype.com. This includes the following libraries: Linotype Originals, Platinum Collection, FontFont, Monotype Library, ITC Library, Bitstream and Ascender.
You can get web fonts from a lot of our partner foundries using the "Pay once" model.