Univers® Next Typewriter font family


Designed by  Adrian Frutiger in 2010
Linotype Design Studio in 2010

Univers Next Typewriter

Typewriter Fonts

Typewriter Fonts: The special flair for your designs

Typewriter Fonts
The typewriter, the symbol of office communication for many decades, has long since had its day. People still like to simulate that special typographic aesthetic, however. The letters, usually designed to have uniform widths, form a pleasant contrast to the otherwise perfectly set digital fonts. Typewriter fonts radiate the retro feel of office communication. They reproduce the aesthetics of document created individually in the office, and thus fill a gap between the personal, hand-written letter and the clean typesetting of mass print. It is a special creative expression that the magazine “Der Spiegel” used for many years in its editorial.
Typewriter fonts also have a second link. The first digital computer fonts were also monospace and restricted to the basic letter forms. Their pure, digital flair is still valued in the music and party scene, to some extent. Below we present two very special representatives of the genre in more detail.


Univers Next Typewriter

Univers Next Typewriter

The humanist sans serif Univers® was designed by Adrian Frutiger in the 1950s and has enjoyed uninterrupted popularity ever since. At the end of the 1990s, Frutiger and Akira Kobayashi published a major revision of the font. They later named this new version Univers® Next.
Univers® Next Typewriter is a sub-family with fixed width and correspondingly adapted letter forms. The most striking changes are the serif-like crossbars in narrow letters like the “i”, “j” or “l”.
Univers Next Typewriter combines the friendly nature of Univers with the charm of a typewriter font. Use the font for short notes, messages or to directly address the customer, for example. The striking shapes of Univers Next Typewriter can also draw attention in headlines, however.


OCR A Tribute

OCR A Tribute

The United States Government originally commissioned OCR-A as the first machine-readable font in the 1960s. Because of its in part idiosyncratic, technical shapes, the font won many fans in many different applications. Miriam Röttgers worked on the font in 2006, revised and supplemented the letters and published OCR A Tribute™. The font is available in two versions, monospaced and proportional, each with three weights. To better make use of space, the letters of the monospaced version have modifications typical of this genre, thus emphasizing the special character of the font. Röttgers added old-style figures, which is somewhat unconventional for this genre.
With its technical, futuristic and digital radiance, OCR A Tribute has earned a fixed place in the hearts of designers. In recent years, this genre of fonts was discovered by the world of electronic music.