Helvetica® font family


Designed by  Linotype Design Studio in 1961
Max Miedinger
Helvetica is one of the most famous and popular typefaces in the world. It lends an air of lucid efficiency to any typographic message with its clean, no-nonsense shapes. The original typeface was called Neue Haas Grotesk, and was designed in 1957 by Max Miedinger for the Haas'sche Schriftgiesserei (Haas Type Foundry) in Switzerland. In 1960 the name was changed to Helvetica (an adaptation of Helvetia", the Latin name for Switzerland).

Over the years, the original Helvetica family was expanded to include many different weights, but these were not as well coordinated with each other as they might have been. In 1983, D. Stempel AG and Linotype re-designed and digitized Neue Helvetica and updated it into a cohesive font family. At the beginning of the 21st Century, Linotype again released an updated design of Helvetica, the Helvetica World typeface family. This family is much smaller in terms of its number of fonts, but each font makes up for this in terms of language support. Helvetica World supports a number of languages and writing systems from all over the globe.

Helvetica World, an update to the classic Helvetica design using the OpenType font format, contains the following Microsoft code pages:
1252 Latin 1,
1250 Latin 2 Eastern,
1251 Cyrillic,
1253 Greek,
1254 Turk,
1255 Hebrew,
1256 Arabic,
1257 Windows Baltic,
1258 Windows Vietnamese,
as well as a mixture of box drawing element glyphs and mathematical symbols & operators.
In total, each weight of Helvetica World contains 1866 different glyph characters!

Many customers ask us what good non-Latin typefaces can be mixed with Helvetica World. Fortunately, Helvetica World already includes Greek, Cyrillic and a specially-designed Hebrew in its OpenType character set. But Linotype also offers a number of CJK fonts that can be matched with Helvetica World.

Helvetica®

Desktop fonts are designed to be installed on a computer for use with applications. Licensed per computer.
Web fonts are used with the CSS @font-face rule. They are licensed for a set number of page views with no time limitation.
Web fonts are used with the CSS rule @font-face used. The license has no time limit.
Mobile App Fonts can be embedded in your mobile application. Each app requires a separate license. The license is based on the number of app installations.
Electronic Publication Fonts can be embedded in an eBook, eMagazine or eNewspaper. Fonts are licensed per issue.
Server fonts can be installed on a server and e.g. used by automated processes to create items. A license is per server core CPU per year.
You can use this type of license to embed web fonts in digital ads, such as ads created in HTML5. The licenses are valid for a specific number of ad impressions without time limit.
Helvetica


Select technical format and
language support of the font.














Technical details
OpenType outline flavour:
TTF - TrueType-Outlines
Technical font names:
File name: HelveticaLTStd-Fractions.ttf
Windows menu name: Helvetica LT Std Fractions
PostScript name: HelveticaLTStd-Fractions
PostScript full name: Helvetica LT Std Fractions
Catalog number:
168460809
Characters:
121
US$ 35
Add to cart

Features

Denominators

Tag: dnom

Function: Replaces selected figures which follow a slash with denominator figures. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 17 into denominators when the user applies the fraction feature.

Fractions

Tag: frac

Function: Replaces figures separated by a slash with 'common' (diagonal) fractions. The user enters 3/4 in a recipe and gets the threequarters fraction.

Numerators

Tag: numr

Function: Replaces selected figures which precede a slash with numerator figures, and replaces the typographic slash with the fraction slash. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 11 into numerators, and the slash into a fraction slash when the user applies the fraction feature.

Ornaments

Tag: ornm

Function: This is a dual-function feature, which uses two input methods to give the user access to ornament glyphs (e.g. fleurons, dingbats and border elements) in the font. One method replaces the bullet character with a selection from the full set of available ornaments; the other replaces specific "lower ASCII" characters with ornaments assigned to them. The first approach supports the general or browsing user; the second supports the power user. The user inputs qwwwwwwwwwe to form the top of a flourished box in Adobe Caslon, or inputs the bullet character, then chooses the thistle dingbat.

Sylistic Set 1

Tag: ss01

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

Sylistic Set 2

Tag: ss02

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

Sylistic Set 3

Tag: ss03

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

Sylistic Set 4

Tag: ss04

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

Alternative Fractions

Tag: afrc

Function: Replaces figures separated by a slash with an alternative form. The user enters 3/4 in a recipe and get the threequarters nut fraction.

Sylistic Set

Tag: ss00

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

Optical Size

Tag: size

Function: This feature stores two kinds of information about the optical size of the font: design size (the point size for which the font is optimized) and size range (the range of point sizes which the font can serve well), as well as other information which helps applications use the size range. The design size is useful for determining proper tracking behavior. The size range is useful in families which have fonts covering several ranges. Additional values serve to identify the set of fonts which share related size ranges, and to identify their shared name. Note that sizes refer to nominal final output size, and are independent of viewing magnification or resolution. Required implementation: The Feature table of this GPOS feature contains no lookups; its Feature Parameters field records an offset from the beginning of the Feature table to an array of five 16-bit unsigned integer values. The size feature must be implemented in all fonts in any family which uses the feature. In this usage, a family is a set of fonts which share a Preferred Family name (name ID 16), or Font Family name (name ID 1) if the Preferred Family name is absent.
The first value represents the design size in 720/inch units (decipoints). The design size entry must be non-zero. When there is a design size but no recommended size range, the rest of the array will consist of zeros. The second value has no independent meaning, but serves as an identifier that associates fonts in a subfamily. All fonts which share a Preferred or Font Family name and which differ only by size range shall have the same subfamily value, and no fonts which differ in weight or style shall have the same subfamily value. If this value is zero, the remaining fields in the array will be ignored. The third value enables applications to use a single name for the subfamily identified by the second value. If the preceding value is non-zero, this value must be set in the range 256 - 32767 (inclusive). It records the value of a field in the name table, which must contain English-language strings encoded in Windows Unicode and Macintosh Roman, and may contain additional strings localized to other scripts and languages. Each of these strings is the name an application should use, in combination with the family name, to represent the subfamily in a menu. Applications will choose the appropriate version based on their selection criteria. The fourth and fifth values represent the small end of the recommended usage range (exclusive) and the large end of the recommended usage range (inclusive), stored in 720/inch units (decipoints). Ranges must not overlap, and should generally be contiguous. The size information in Bell Centennial is [60 0 0 0 0]. This tells an application that the fontâs design size is six points, so larger sizes may need proportionate reduction in default inter-glyph spacing. The size information in Minion Pro Semibold Condensed Subhead is [180 3 257 139 240]. These values tell an application that: The font's design size is 18 points; This font is part of a subfamily of fonts that differ only by the size range which each covers, and which share the arbitrary identifier number 3; ID 257 in the name table is the suggested menu name for this subfamily. In this case, the string at name ID 257 is Semibold Condensed; This font is the recommended choice from sizes greater than 13.9-point up through 24-points.