Brandon Grotesque font family


Designed by Hannes von Döhren
With his Brandon Grotesque font, the type designer Hannes von Döhren has shown that he does not just have the knack of designing display fonts such as Snoogle™ or elaborate Antiquas like Opal™. In this font von Döhren skilfully combines the forms of the structured sans serif fonts of the 1920's and 30's with elements of contemporary typography.
Hannes von Döhren took the structures sans serif fonts of the 20's and 30's in the 20th century as his inspiration for the Brandon Grotesque. However, von Döhren reworked the structured forms with legibility in mind. Thus, for example, the "c" clearly shows that its prototype is the circle, while the arches in "b" and "d" tend more to recall a humanist sans serif with a very slight variation in the stroke width and a Renaissance Antiqua as prototype. With the open common "a" and the looptail "g" von Döhren is coming closer to the forms of the Antiqua than those of a structured sans serif. Nevertheless anyone who prefers the closed "a" can obtain it as an alternative via the format sets of the Open Type font.
With the slightly rounded corners of the Brandon Grotesque von Döhren is not just counteracting the cool and formal character of the structured sans serif, but is giving a warm complexion to the noble character of the font, produced by the low x-height. In addition, the rounded off corners lend the font a modern touch, which is borne out by the slightly conical stroke in "n", "p" or "r", for example, among other details.
Brandon Grotesque is available in six stroke widths from Thin to Black; the forms of the Thin font style are reduced almost to a hairline. There is a matching Italic font style for all stroke widths, in which the slanted letters are justified slightly more narrowly. In addition, the "a" changes to the closed form and the "g" changes to the monocular form, the "f" is given a crossbar and the common "e" a more rounded form.
Thanks to its unobtrusive, neutral, but nonetheless distinctive character, the Brandon Grotesque can be used in a variety of areas of application; while von Döhren thinks that the very Thin and the thick Black are more suitable for display purposes, the other stroke widths also cut a very fine figure in the area of text. The skilled combination of structured sans serif with elements of modern typography makes Brandon Grotesque highly individual, and ideal to enhance your layouts.

Brandon Grotesque Light

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STD supports at least 21 languages.















US$ 80
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502 characters

Features:

Catalog number: 167394807

Case-Sensitive Forms

Tag: case

Function: Shifts various punctuation marks up to a position that works better with all-capital sequences or sets of lining figures; also changes oldstyle figures to lining figures. By default, glyphs in a text face are designed to work with lowercase characters. Some characters should be shifted vertically to fit the higher visual center of all-capital or lining text. Also, lining figures are the same height (or close to it) as capitals, and fit much better with all-capital text. The user selects a block of text and applies this feature. The dashes, bracketing characters, guillemet quotes and the like shift up to match the capitals, and oldstyle figures change to lining figures.

Denominators

Tag: dnom

Function: Replaces selected figures which follow a slash with denominator figures. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 17 into denominators when the user applies the fraction feature.

Fractions

Tag: frac

Function: Replaces figures separated by a slash with 'common' (diagonal) fractions. The user enters 3/4 in a recipe and gets the threequarters fraction.

Standard Ligatures

Tag: liga

Function: Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a single glyph which is preferred for typographic purposes. This feature covers the ligatures which the designer/manufacturer judges should be used in normal conditions. The glyph for ffl replaces the sequence of glyphs f f l.

Localized Forms

Tag: locl

Function: Many scripts used to write multiple languages over wide geographical areas have developed localized variant forms of specific letters, which are used by individual literary communities. For example, a number of letters in the Bulgarian and Serbian alphabets have forms distinct from their Russian counterparts and from each other. In some cases the localized form differs only subtly from the script 'norm', in others the forms are radically distinct. This feature enables localized forms of glyphs to be substituted for default forms. The user applies this feature to text to enable localized Bulgarian forms of Cyrillic letters; alternatively, the feature might enable localized Russian forms in a Bulgarian manufactured font in which the Bulgarian forms are the default characters.

Numerators

Tag: numr

Function: Replaces selected figures which precede a slash with numerator figures, and replaces the typographic slash with the fraction slash. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 11 into numerators, and the slash into a fraction slash when the user applies the fraction feature.

Ordinals

Tag: ordn

Function: Replaces default alphabetic glyphs with the corresponding ordinal forms for use after figures. One exception to the follows-a-figure rule is the numero character (U+2116), which is actually a ligature substitution, but is best accessed through this feature. The user applies this feature to turn 2.o into 2.o (abbreviation for secundo).

Proportional Figures

Tag: pnum

Function: Replaces figure glyphs set on uniform (tabular) widths with corresponding glyphs set on glyph-specific (proportional) widths. Tabular widths will generally be the default, but this cannot be safely assumed. Of course this feature would not be present in monospaced designs. The user may apply this feature to get even spacing for lining figures used as dates in an all-cap headline.

Scientific Inferiors

Tag: sinf

Function: Replaces lining or oldstyle figures with inferior figures (smaller glyphs which sit lower than the standard baseline, primarily for chemical or mathematical notation). May also replace lowercase characters with alphabetic inferiors. The application can use this feature to automatically access the inferior figures (more legible than scaled figures).

Superscript

Tag: sups

Function: Replaces lining or oldstyle figures with superior figures (primarily for footnote indication), and replaces lowercase letters with superior letters (primarily for abbreviated French titles). The application can use this feature to automatically access the superior figures (more legible than scaled figures) for footnotes, or the user can apply it to Mssr to get the classic form.

Tabular Figures

Tag: tnum

Function: Replaces figure glyphs set on proportional widths with corresponding glyphs set on uniform (tabular) widths. Tabular widths will generally be the default, but this cannot be safely assumed. Of course this feature would not be present in monospaced designs. The user may apply this feature to get oldstyle figures to align vertically in a column.

Stylistic Alternates

Tag: salt

Function: Many fonts contain alternate glyph designs for a purely esthetic effect; these don't always fit into a clear category like swash or historical. As in the case of swash glyphs, there may be more than one alternate form. This feature replaces the default forms with the stylistic alternates. The user applies this feature to Industria to get the alternate form of g.

Sylistic Set 1

Tag: ss01

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.

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