Future Bugler Upright font family


Designed by Harry Warren in 2011
Future Bugler is a font based on the second logo created by Harry Warren in early 1975 for his sixth grade class newsletter, The Broadwater Bugler, at Broadwater Academy in Exmore, Virginia, on Virginia's Eastern Shore. This font can convey several perspectives or moods. It can suggest a space-age vision of the future, or an art-deco perspective of the future as in the movie Captain Sky and the World of Tomorrow". It also communicates the idea of high performance, or extreme sports, without the grunge. Digitized by John Bomparte."

Future Bugler Upright

Future Bugler Upright
world-map Std map

Std / OT TTF

supports at least

21 languages.















Technical details
OpenType outline flavour:
TTF - TrueType-Outlines
Technical font names:
File name: FutureBuglerUpright-Light.ttf
Windows menu name: Future Bugler Upright Light
PostScript name: FutureBuglerUprightLight
PostScript full name: Future Bugler Upright Light
Catalog number:
168393853
Characters:
249
US$ 35
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Features

Standard Ligatures

Tag: liga

Function: Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a single glyph which is preferred for typographic purposes. This feature covers the ligatures which the designer/manufacturer judges should be used in normal conditions. The glyph for ffl replaces the sequence of glyphs f f l.

Stylistic Alternates

Tag: salt

Function: Many fonts contain alternate glyph designs for a purely esthetic effect; these don't always fit into a clear category like swash or historical. As in the case of swash glyphs, there may be more than one alternate form. This feature replaces the default forms with the stylistic alternates. The user applies this feature to Industria to get the alternate form of g.

Sylistic Set 1

Tag: ss01

Function: In addition to, or instead of, stylistic alternatives of individual glyphs (see 'salt' feature), some fonts may contain sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set, e.g. multiple variants for lowercase letters in a Latin font. Glyphs in stylistic sets may be designed to harmonise visually, interract in particular ways, or otherwise work together. Examples of fonts including stylistic sets are Zapfino Linotype and Adobe's Poetica. Individual features numbered sequentially with the tag name convention 'ss01' 'ss02' 'ss03' . 'ss20' provide a mechanism for glyphs in these sets to be associated via GSUB lookup indexes to default forms and to each other, and for users to select from available stylistic sets.