New font releases in March 2014

A review of new releases:
animated, well-supported calligraphic fonts and super families for use in corporate design



With our readers in mind, we have again made a selection from the many new fonts that have recently appeared and that we consider to be both exceptional and original. We are sure you will be surprised by the extraordinarily creative and extensive calligraphic fonts while you may even find among them the ideal font for your next design project.

Tondo (Dalton Maag)


The slightly flattened ends of the rounded sans serif Tondo by Veronika Burian make the font appear stable and help avoid the fuzziness that can often be associated with rounded terminals, particularly in smaller point sizes. The letters of Tondo have a large x-height and are thus clearly legible in smaller sizes. Thanks to their neutral effect, they can be used in a wide range of different contexts.

Al Fresco (Laura Worthington)


Laura Worthington’s Al Fresco is breezy and light but still very expressive, making it ideal for use in situations where a youthful and somewhat elegant impression needs to be made. Thanks to its many alternative glyphs, ligatures, swash variants and ornaments, this font can be adapted to the needs of a wide range of specific needs.

Roble (Latinotype)


Generously proportioned and open letters give the slab serif Roble by Daniel Hernández a warm and friendly character. This well-supported font is available in eight different weights, each of which has a matching italic.

Bambola (EdyType)


Romance with a touch of flirtiness are the main personality traits of the brush script-derived Bambola by Ricardo Rousselot. There are alternative glyphs to provide for sufficient diversity, a characteristic that can be exploited in contexts such as lettering on packaging or in headlines.

Timesquare (Campotype)


The buckled line terminals and round letter forms of Andi AW. Masry’s sans serif Timesquare provide the font with a vitality that is even more apparent in the italic styles.

Finch (Green Type)


Condensed, slightly irregular, hand-painted letters are the determining features of this typical comic font Finch by Dimitry Greshnev. Greshnev has designed a second version of this font specifically for use in animation. The five different weights have slightly altered letter forms that, when used in combination, make the characters appear as if quivering. The many symbols designed to match the fonts also seem to be in motion when used in this way.

Serafine (Fontyou)


There is something about the slim and elegant Serafine by Jason Vandenberg, Alisa Nowak and Jérémie Hornus that is reminiscent of a Didone. The unusual tittle form and the other extended line terminals give it a very unique appearance. This font works best in larger text sizes.

Korolev (Device Fonts)


The synthetic letters provide Rian Hughes’ Korolev with a somewhat technological, stencil-like feel. It makes a solid impression thanks to the very generous x-height and is available in many styles in different weights and widths. Korolev is at home not only in headlines, but also in longer sections of text.

Drumbeat (EdyType)


Ricardo Rousselot has managed to capture the essence of rapid but neatly produced handwriting in his Drumbeat. Major contrasts in line weight and the regular ups and downs of the letters provide the font with a rhythm that is all its own.

Avengeance (The Fontry)


This font has been specifically developed for use in logo design. Avengeance by Michael Gene Adkins comes in two styles. While Avengeance is very condensed, has slightly angular letters and is supplied with a wealth of initial letters, Avengeance Mightiest Avenger is more rounded and even exhibits some irregularities of form.

Braxton (Fontfabric Type Foundry)


The main distinguishing features of the brush font Braxton by Evgeny Tkhorzhevsky are its clearly defined forms and excellent legibility. Within its five weight styles are many alternative glyphs and ligatures that will ensure that it is possible to create a fluid text effect. Braxton can be used, for example, in headlines for T-shirts.

Klaus (Fontyou)


Klaus, designed by Gregori Vincens, Gia Tran, Jérémie Hornus and Alisa Nowak , has rounded outlines with more angular internal corners that give it an unusual character that is not unlike that of Blackletter. The bevelled line terminals offset to some extent the rigidity of the font and infuse it with vitality. Its extensive variants and styles and high level of recognisability mean that it is ideal for use in corporate design contexts.

Alek (Fenotype)


Alek by Emil Bertell comes in two weights with alternative glyphs, such as swashes, titling alternates, ligatures, numerous ornaments, curlicues and decorative elements; in other words, everything that a designer needs to create logos, special headlines or titles.

In a Jar (Latinotype)


Taking its inspiration from the script on grandma’s pots of home-made preserves, Guisela Mendoza’s In a Jar has the effect of genial and somewhat irregular hand lettering. Additional styles with all kinds of pictograms and ornaments round off the range of glyphs on offer so that there is everything necessary for anyone looking, for example, to design packaging for traditional foodstuffs.

Related products

Tondo font family (Dalton Maag)
Al Fresco font family (Laura Worthington)
Roble font family (Latinotype)
Bambola font family (EdyType)
Timesquare font family (Campotype)
Finch font family (Green Type)
Korolev font family (Device Fonts)
Drumbeat font family (EdyType)
Avengeance font family (Fontry, The)
Braxton font family (Fontfabric Type Foundry)
Alek font family (Fenotype)
In a Jar font family (Latinotype)