Wolfsblood

Wolfsblood

Wolfsblood by Jim Ford and other fonts for Halloween

Ghosts and ghouls will be stalking the streets again as darkness falls on 31 October. And no Halloween party would be complete without a suitable typeface. Monotype has a range of fonts with which you can introduce a touch of terror and goose bumps, dread and screams or the chill of the crypt into your invitations. You will also find an abundance of creepy symbols in our pictogram fonts. We describe a small selection of these in the following.

Wolfsblood

It is not just the name of Jim Ford’s Wolfsblood that gives it a touch of the uncanny. Its irregular characters are evocative of the typefaces used on old horror and science fiction film posters while the wavy and slightly jittery outline of the font seems to perfectly replicate the long-drawn out howl of a wolf on a night with a full moon.

Wolfsblood

Wolfsblood is primarily an uppercase font. The form of both the lowercase and uppercase letters reproduces that of the capitals; the only difference is minor variation in size. In some cases, genuine lowercase versions of characters are available so that is possible to combine the two forms to vary and diversify a text. There is a wealth of ligatures and context-sensitive OpenType functions to help with the selection of suitable glyphs. There are also bat-shaped pictograms and framing elements (e.g. in the form of a spider’s web) to round off the range of characters.

Wolfsblood

Wolfsblood is ideal for setting logos, posters, headlines and short texts. The extraordinary energy of this typeface will add bite to your sinister and spooky designs.

Wolfsblood



LTC Halloween Ornaments

LTC Halloween Ornaments
There is not just the hollowed-out pumpkin with glowing eyes but a whole assortment of other eerie symbols available among the pictograms of LTC Halloween Ornaments. Spiders, webs, bats and cats are there as are skulls, owls and even a witch.

Garash Script

Garash Script
Garash Script by Ryoichi Tsunekawa is playful and maybe a little saccharine. At the same time, the angular, somewhat irregular forms could also represent the teeth of a strange beast. It is in any case apparent that this typeface is concealing a secret that one feels one perhaps would rather not know.

Tricky Treat

Tricky Treat
Is it possible that Britton Walters has really used blood to create the letters of Tricky Treat on paper? The characters of this very irregular typeface do not reveal what kind of writing instrument was actually used, but the texture of the coarse surface is readily recognisable.

AE Dracena

AE Dracena
The passage of time is what the broken outlines and slightly weathered forms of AE Dracena initially suggest. This font is redolent of magical incantations in ancient documents or of signs providing directions to the catacombs of a haunted castle.

Cruller

Cruller
The ink appears to be still wet and has run a little here and there. This gives the hand-drawn letters of Ian Lynam’s uppercase font Cruller a spine-chilling vitality. It looks as if the characters are ready to lift themselves from the page at any time after which they will turn into autonomous beings that will set out to conquer the world.

Related products

Wolfsblood™ font family (Monotype Library)
LTC Halloween Ornaments font family (Lanston Type)
Garash Script font family (Flat-it)
Tricky Treat Regular
US$ 15
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Dracena font family (Aerotype)
Cruller Std Regular
US$ 20
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