trytype2

Interviews with trytype 2 videoclip producers





Jannis Borgers
Fourth-year student. Used the fonts: Trade Gothic© Next™, Copal™.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts?
Trade Gothic has always been one of my favourite fonts. I like Trade Gothic – it’s both honest and expressive. I was less impressed by Copal – it may not be particularly attractive, but it is certainly very unusual.

What made you select these fonts?
The new Trade Gothic Next is a revitalised version of the original font that has been provided with some striking details. I have already been using Trade Gothic for several years and I found myself (again) attracted to the new, more consistently designed Next.
What I first noticed when I looked at Copal Solid was its wide, stable form. This meant that it was ideal when it comes to providing it with depth for the film so that it could be shown in a three dimensional form.

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
I wanted to portray Trade Gothic as a serious or even old-fashioned font that is not quite as earnest as it might seem at first. It plays tricks and is really nothing more than a big child behind that serious facade.
As a substance, copal is actually a tree resin, rather like amber. I wanted to exploit this similarity of names in combination with the 3D realisation. I found it exciting to combine hard and semitransparent letters that move wedged together, casting changing patterns of light and shadow on themselves and their surroundings. These resin letters are never displayed in full and are rapidly drawn back into the rotating letter block.

Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?
You learn a great deal, particularly with regard to microtypographic aspects because you become involved with the individual fonts and you sort of internalise them. After a while, you are familiar with each letter of the font and their characteristics and know what is and what isn’t compatible with them.

What’s your favourite font? What would a font designed by you be like (style, applications, characteristics)?
I love sans serif typefaces. Their constrained structure always seems to inspire font designers to include small but imaginative details. The American Gothic fonts really appeal to me. I have recently begun often using these in combination with playful, rounded script fonts. I work on numerous screen designs and find this combination to be particularly effective as it can be used to rapidly impart information without becoming monotonous.




Isa Hartikainen
Third-year student. Used the fonts: Eurostile Next®, Virtuosa® Classic.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts?
Eurostile Next seems to me to be self-assured and dominant; it has a rapid pulse.
Virtuosa Classic is like a confident woman. She may be delicate but she has a strength of character that one can only envy.

What made you select these fonts?
I followed two concepts. For my Eurostile Next animation I used a font that is readily compatible with a technological, systematic, digital environment. In the case of my Virtuosa Classic animation I used a font that seems fragile and delicate, but is clearly legible and provides for a consistent print effect.

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
I wanted to express the progression of intellectual workflow in my Eurostile Next animation. How the creative process commences almost without one being aware of it, runs at full blast for a while, then tends to drop off as soon as any insight, no matter how small, has been gained.
In contrast, my Virtuosa Classic animation takes its origin from emotions. My aim was to use the font to create an impression of beauty and lightness.

Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?
I believe I can speak for everyone when I say that typefaces become firmly embedded in your mind when you work intensely with them. Even while selecting the fonts, you suddenly became aware that the tiniest details are important when it comes to choosing the right typeface. You become very intimate with your chosen fonts while working with them.

What’s your favourite font? What would a font designed by you be like (style, applications, characteristics)?
I liked Klint best of all. It has a pleasant appearance, makes a modern impression and has attractive details.
If I were to design a typeface I would use a lot of graphic elements and make it striking, almost geometrical – but also give it a certain something so that it becomes a sort of architectural sans serif. Simple but eye-catching. It would be perfect for use in headlines in all sorts of contexts.




Xian Jin
Third-year student. Used the fonts: Aeonis™, PMN Caecilia®, DIN Next™, Diotima®, Klint™, Nautilus™.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts?
I worked with a total of six different fonts, each of which I perceived differently:
Aeonis: modern, innovative, stable and avant-garde.
PMN Caecilia: feminine, delicate, graceful, elegant.
DIN Next: compact, plain, distinct.
Diotima: playful, artistic, very demonstrative.
Klint: rectilinear, inflexible, conservative.
Nautilus: friendly, gentle, quiet, soft.

What made you select these fonts?
Every font has its individual character and distinctive features. My purpose was to explore and experiment with these.

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
Aeonis: 3D morphing, alphabetic architecture.
Caecilia: the Big Bang, the Creation.
DIN Next: interactive effects derived from “growing typography”.
Diotima: individual composition and design, morphing of the letters.
Klint: breakdown of the structures in time with the music.
Nautilus: a typeface in its natural environment.

Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?
I think you can learn a great deal because you get to know the fonts in all their details.




Salina Kesselring
Used the fonts: ITC Chino™, Aeonis, Waza™.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts? What made you select these fonts?
I decided to use some very different typefaces as every concept needs an individually tailored aesthetic approach. Each font has its own qualities and creates a specific mood when combined with music and movement! Sometimes happy, relaxed, bright and playful – sometimes severe, harsh and strident!

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
ITC Chino (“petitgrand”): A small ‘o’ of the ITC Chino font family opens my animation. This dances into view in time with the music. The effect is rather like that of a marketplace seen from above; many different letters cross the screen, bump into each other, move on and disappear only to reappear. All their movements are choreographed to the music. The first sequence shows lower case letters that represent small people that become bigger and turn into the larger upper case letters. A special focus is on the ‘i’ as this letter is shown going against the flow! There are two variants of this animation – a very graphic black-and-white rendering and a colourful version.
Aeonis (“cityparadise”): The purpose of this animation is to showcase the fonts ‘Aeonis’ and ‘Waza’. Aeonis represents a city skyline and embodies the hard, harsh, heartless starkness of a large metropolis. Waza offers a contrast with its bright and colourful effects. Waza represents nature and is very organic and playful. The two fonts readily complement each other and thus create their own little world.
The marked contrasts between urban and rural are effectively accentuated by the raw, harsh soundtrack (with added car horns) and much more cheerful musical chords.
ITC Chino (“typedance”): deliberately chose to use the ITC Chino font again - this time in the form of ITC Chino Display - as I wanted to show the differences that can exist even within the same type family.
The musical score is very vivid, wild, youthful and particularly dynamic. I used a matching palette of colours to go with it – the complementary colours red and green modified to a neon-like, bluish hue that has a really elegant effect.
Taking their cue from the music, patterns of lines of the various colours develop. From these, other letters emerge at regular intervals and their movements are all coordinated with the music.

Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?
As long as you are enjoying what you are doing and are passionate about it, you can really learn a very great deal!

What’s your favourite font? What would a font designed by you be like (style, applications, characteristics)?
Oh; there is a great deal of really brilliant fonts. That’s the great thing - I don’t think I could pick out just one. Each font has something to say for itself. With their individual and very different characteristics, they are all capable of creating, in their own way, a unique mood. For every circumstance and situation there is a matching font!




Carina Klein
Third-year student. Used the fonts: Waza, Malabar™, Klint™, ITC Chino.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts?
Waza: suggests to me classical music, high quality chocolates and attractive paper on which the font is printed.
Malabar: suggests to me magazines, newspapers and headlines - tradition combined with cutting-edge.
Klint: suggests to me limitlessness and technology. Although Klint seems avant-garde, it is in no way pretentious.
ITC Chino: when you look at Chino, it is like seeing friendly smile.

What made you select these fonts?
Waza: the music came first and then I looked for a matching font. I think I chose well!
Malabar: I had a particular story in mind and wanted to use a font that had distinctive features – with regard to the serifs, for example.
Klint: Klint is appropriate for use in technical contexts (such as mobile phones, internet, hardware and software) – this was the framework I wanted to present it in, but in a somewhat different fashion.
ITC Chino: I used this font to set a contrast with the atmosphere of my animation.

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
Waza: I wanted to draw attention to the distinctive structures of Waza by allowing the letters to take shape and thus form an image. My idea was to have the font contextualised by the classical music and images that it evokes.
Malabar: storytelling was at the forefront in this animation - a swarm of gnats made of letters. By having the letters fly towards the viewer so that they are displayed on a very large scale, the viewer sees the serifs in particular detail.
Klint: my underlying intention here was to show the viewer all the typeface variants, and when these typefaces begin to dance, it becomes much more fun to watch!
ITC Chino: a mysterious, enigmatic atmosphere, underscored by the music and right in the middle of all this – the friendly Chino. This draws attention to the font.

Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?
I think there’s an awful lot you can learn. Animation brings the fonts to life: they move, they breathe and they stir emotions. They appeal to several senses at once. The fonts are placed directly within a context because a specific concept is being realised. For this to work, producer and font need to be closely acquainted.

What’s your favourite font? What would a font designed by you be like (style, applications, characteristics)?
Although it is only through the trytype2 project that I got to know Malabar, it is already one of my favourite fonts. It is robust and is perfect for use not only in headlines but also in continuous text. I particularly like typefaces that are traditional, but at the same time are contemporary.
If I was designing my own font, I would visit the workshop of the Gutenberg-Museums in Mainz for inspiration. I would create a friendly and contemporary serif typeface that would be ideal for use in well-designed books.



Agathe Schütze
Fourth-year student. Used the fonts: Veljovic Script™, Neudoerffer Fraktur™, Copal.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts? Why did you select these fonts?
I selected those fonts in which I was at once able to perceive an image, a story or a particular form when I first contemplated them.
Copal, for example, immediately brought to mind old computer games like Tetris because the letters look like little building blocks.
The oval counters of Veljovic Script reminded me of musical notes and thus straight away suggested classical music. Neudoerffer Fraktur has a very illustrative character. The letters look more like decorative swirls than text. I could see a vast range of widely different things in the letters, such as hats, trees and cats.

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?

For me, presentation of information is not the central purpose of animation. This means that the fonts cease have their normal function. The individual letters are much more intensively observed and analysed. You look for what determines the character of the font so that you can emphasise this through animation. This means that you get to know each font much more intimately and its characteristics become fixed in your mind thanks to working closely with it.

What’s your favourite font? What would a font designed by you be like (style, applications, characteristics)?
I don’t have a favourite font. But looking at them, I must say that I find myself drawn to Aeonis. It’s a beautifully simple font. But when you look more closely at it and depending on what you are writing you discover that marvellous open, upper case A that makes the font so special.



Katharina Wagner
Third-year student. Used the fonts: DIN Next™, Francker™, Eurostile Next.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts?
DIN Next: strength, steadfastness, maturity.
Francker: brash, assertive.
Eurostile Next: angular, constructive.

What made you select these fonts?
DIN Next: This is a very attractive font that fits in everywhere. It is elegant although contemporary and can be used in almost all contexts. A delightful typeface.
Francker: Totally compatible with the LED displays. It draws attention to itself and is suitable for use in large and loud environments.
Eurostile Next: There is something architectural about this font. Its curves have a certain angularity, making the font consistent with architectural drawings.

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
To ensure that nothing happened to them - that they were not dismantled and retained their integrity. But this meant they needed to be transposed into a world/environment that enabled the corresponding font to evoke appropriate emotions. The purpose of the animation was to inspire and awake interest in the font.

Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?
By being exposed to them, I have got to know a lot more about typography and the various font families. It was this process that first made me aware of what qualities complement each individual font. It is interesting how closely you become involved with the various fonts and how quickly you develop preferences for certain typeface families.

What’s your favourite font? What would a font designed by you be like (style, applications, characteristics)?
DIN Next has become my favourite font. It is very versatile and also very appealing.




Miriam Wagner
Fourth-year student. Used the fonts: DIN Next, ITC Chino, ElegyQuench®.

What sort of qualities do you associate with your selected fonts?
DIN Next is very clear-cut and structured; it expresses orderliness. ITC Chino is flexible and cheerful, while Elegy is cold and aristocratic. As for Quench – well, I don’t really know.

What made you select these fonts?
I mainly just sort of followed my gut feelings. I chose those fonts that at first glance reminded me of something.

What concepts did you employ when converting the fonts to animated graphics?
I simply tried playing around at first for the animation using Quench. Then the idea came to me that I should think about what the fonts express or could be used to say. So I chose the fonts on this basis and allowed them tell me what their various characteristics are.

Do you think that you can learn anything from combining fonts and animation?
The longer you are involved with a typeface, the more likely you are to develop a relationship with it, irrespective of whether you think of it as good or bad. The greatest challenge for me was using After Effects as I tend to have a preference for the printed medium.

What’s your favourite font? What would a font designed by you be like (style, applications, characteristics)?
Currently, my favourite fonts are DIN Next (since working on trytype 2, of course) and the font Buttermilk by Jessica Hiche. On the whole, I prefer serif typefaces, but DIN Next is so well-defined that it can be readily combined with its opposite. During the project, I also grew to be really fond of Waza because, just like Buttermilk (although it is completely different), it has no similarities with other cursive fonts designed to date, which tend to be alike and already have particular labels attached to them. If I were to design a font, it would almost certainly be an old-fashioned serif typeface or a cursive typeface.