Times New Roman® World font family


Designed by Victor Lardent
Stanley Morison
In 1931, The Times of London commissioned a new text type design from Stanley Morison and the Monotype Corporation, after Morison had written an article criticizing The Times for being badly printed and typographically behind the times. The new design was supervised by Stanley Morison and drawn by Victor Lardent, an artist from the advertising department of The Times. Morison used an older typeface, Plantin, as the basis for his design, but made revisions for legibility and economy of space (always important concerns for newspapers). As the old type used by the newspaper had been called Times Old Roman," Morison's revision became "Times New Roman." The Times of London debuted the new typeface in October 1932, and after one year the design was released for commercial sale. The Times New Roman World Version is an extension of the original Times New Roman with several other scripts like with the Helvetica World fonts. It is part of the Windows Vista system.
The following code pages are supported:1250 Latin 2: Eastern European
1251 Cyrillic
1253 Greek
1254 Turkish
1255 Hebrew
1256 Arabic
Note: The Roman and Bold versions include the arabic scripts but they are not part in the corresponding italic versions.
1257 Windows Baltic
1258 Windows Vietnamese"

Times New Roman® World















Technical details
Digital data from:
OpenType outline flavour:
TTF - TrueType-Outlines
Technical font names:
File name: timesbd.ttf
Windows menu name: Times New Roman
PostScript name: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT
PostScript full name: Times New Roman Bold
Catalog number:
26888649
Characters:
3891
US$ 165
Add to cart
XSF

Features

Languages

Denominators

Tag: dnom

Function: Replaces selected figures which follow a slash with denominator figures. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 17 into denominators when the user applies the fraction feature.

Fractions

Tag: frac

Function: Replaces figures separated by a slash with 'common' (diagonal) fractions. The user enters 3/4 in a recipe and gets the threequarters fraction.

Standard Ligatures

Tag: liga

Function: Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a single glyph which is preferred for typographic purposes. This feature covers the ligatures which the designer/manufacturer judges should be used in normal conditions. The glyph for ffl replaces the sequence of glyphs f f l.

Lining Figures

Tag: lnum

Function: This feature changes selected figures from oldstyle to the default lining form. The user invokes this feature in order to get lining figures, which fit better with all-capital text. Various characters designed to be used with figures may also be covered by this feature. In cases where lining figures are the default form, this feature would undo previous substitutions.

Localized Forms

Tag: locl

Function: Many scripts used to write multiple languages over wide geographical areas have developed localized variant forms of specific letters, which are used by individual literary communities. For example, a number of letters in the Bulgarian and Serbian alphabets have forms distinct from their Russian counterparts and from each other. In some cases the localized form differs only subtly from the script 'norm', in others the forms are radically distinct. This feature enables localized forms of glyphs to be substituted for default forms. The user applies this feature to text to enable localized Bulgarian forms of Cyrillic letters; alternatively, the feature might enable localized Russian forms in a Bulgarian manufactured font in which the Bulgarian forms are the default characters.

Numerators

Tag: numr

Function: Replaces selected figures which precede a slash with numerator figures, and replaces the typographic slash with the fraction slash. In the string 11/17 selected by the user, the application turns the 11 into numerators, and the slash into a fraction slash when the user applies the fraction feature.

Old Style Figures

Tag: onum

Function: This feature changes selected figures from the default lining style to oldstyle form. The user invokes this feature to get oldstyle figures, which fit better into the flow of normal upper- and lowercase text. Various characters designed to be used with figures may also have oldstyle versions.

Proportional Figures

Tag: pnum

Function: Replaces figure glyphs set on uniform (tabular) widths with corresponding glyphs set on glyph-specific (proportional) widths. Tabular widths will generally be the default, but this cannot be safely assumed. Of course this feature would not be present in monospaced designs. The user may apply this feature to get even spacing for lining figures used as dates in an all-cap headline.

Tabular Figures

Tag: tnum

Function: Replaces figure glyphs set on proportional widths with corresponding glyphs set on uniform (tabular) widths. Tabular widths will generally be the default, but this cannot be safely assumed. Of course this feature would not be present in monospaced designs. The user may apply this feature to get oldstyle figures to align vertically in a column.

Contextual Alternates

Tag: calt

Function: In specified situations, replaces default glyphs with alternate forms which provide better joining behavior. Used in script typefaces which are designed to have some or all of their glyphs join. In Caflisch Script, o is replaced by o.alt2 when followed by an ascending letterform.

Small Capitals From Capitals

Tag: c2sc

Function: Small Capitals From Capitals

Small Capitals

Tag: smcp

Function: This feature turns lowercase characters into small capitals. This corresponds to the common SC font layout. It is generally used for display lines set in Large & small caps, such as titles. Forms related to small capitals, such as oldstyle figures, may be included. The user enters text as mixed capitals and lowercase, and gets Large & small cap text.

Discretionary Ligatures

Tag: dlig

Function: Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a single glyph which is preferred for typographic purposes. This feature covers those ligatures which may be used for special effect, at the user's preference. The glyph for ct replaces the sequence of glyphs c t, or U+322E (Kanji ligature for "Friday") replaces the sequence U+91D1 U+66DC U+65E5.

Initial Forms

Tag: init

Function: Replaces glyphs at the beginnings of words with alternate forms designed for this use. This is common in Latin connecting scripts, and required in various non-Latins like Arabic. In the typeface Ex Ponto, the default t in the word 'type' is replaced with the t.begin form.

Terminal Forms

Tag: fina

Function: Replaces glyphs at the ends of words with alternate forms designed for this use. This is common in Latin connecting scripts, and required in various non-Latins like Arabic. In the typeface Poetica, the default e in the word 'type' is replaced with the e.end form.

Glyph Composition/Decomposition

Tag: ccmp

Function: To minimize the number of glyph alternates, it is sometimes desired to decompose a character into two glyphs. Additionally, it may be preferable to compose two characters into a single glyph for better glyph processing. This feature permits such composition/decompostion. The feature should be processed as the first feature processed, and should be processed only when it is called. In Syriac, the character 0x0732 is a combining mark that has a dot above AND a dot below the base character. To avoid multiple glyph variants to fit all base glyphs, the character is decomposed into two glyphs...a dot above and a dot below. These two glyphs can then be correctly placed using GPOS. In Arabic it might be preferred to combine the shadda with fatha (0x0651, 0x064E) into a ligature before processing shapes. This allows the font vendor to do special handling of the mark combination when doing further processing without requiring larger contextual rules.

Capital Spacing

Tag: cpsp

Function: Globally adjusts inter-glyph spacing for all-capital text. Most typefaces contain capitals and lowercase characters, and the capitals are positioned to work with the lowercase. When capitals are used for words, they need more space between them for legibility and esthetics. This feature would not apply to monospaced designs. Of course the user may want to override this behavior in order to do more pronounced letterspacing for esthetic reasons. The user sets a title in all caps, and the Capital Spacing feature opens the spacing.

Isolated Forms

Tag: isol

Function: Replaces the nominal form of glyphs with their isolated forms. In Arabic, if the Alef is followed by Lam, the default glyph for Alef is replaced with its isolated form.

Kerning

Tag: kern

Function: Adjusts amount of space between glyphs, generally to provide optically consistent spacing between glyphs. Although a well-designed typeface has consistent inter-glyph spacing overall, some glyph combinations require adjustment for improved legibility. Besides standard adjustment in the horizontal direction, this feature can supply size-dependent kerning data via device tables, "cross-stream" kerning in the Y text direction, and adjustment of glyph placement independent of the advance adjustment. Note that this feature may apply to runs of more than two glyphs, and would not be used in monospaced fonts. Also note that this feature does not apply to text set vertically. The o is shifted closer to the T in the combination "To."

Mark Positioning

Tag: mark

Function: Positions mark glyphs with respect to base glyphs. In the Arabic script, positioning the Hamza above the Yeh.

Medial Forms

Tag: medi

Function: Replaces glyphs in the middles of words (i.e. following a beginning and preceding an end) with alternate forms designed for this use. Note: This is different from the default form, which is designed for stand-alone use. This is common in Latin connecting scripts, and required in various non-Latins like Arabic. In the typeface Caflisch Script, the y and p in the word 'type' are replaced by the y.med and p.med forms.

Mark to Mark Positioning

Tag: mkmk

Function: Positions marks with respect to other marks. Required in various non-Latin scripts like Arabic. In Arabic, the ligaturised mark Ha with Hamza above it; can also be obtained by positioning these marks relative to one another.

Required Ligatures

Tag: rlig

Function: Replaces a sequence of glyphs with a single glyph which is preferred for typographic purposes. This feature covers those ligatures, which the script determines as required to be used in normal conditions. This feature is important for some scripts to insure correct glyph formation. The Arabic character lam followed by alef will always form a ligated lamalef form. This ligated form is a requirement of the script's shaping. The same happens with the Syriac script.

These fonts support the Basic Latin character set. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in d

Tag: Basic Latin

Function: These fonts support the Basic Latin character set. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.

These fonts support the modern Greek language. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in diffe

Tag: Greek

Function: These fonts support the modern Greek language. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.

These fonts support the Cyrillic script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different f

Tag: Cyrillic

Function: These fonts support the Cyrillic script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.

These fonts support the Arabic script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different for

Tag: Arabic

Function: These fonts support the Arabic script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.

These fonts support the Hebrew script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different for

Tag: Hebrew

Function: These fonts support the Hebrew script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.

These fonts support the Vietnamese script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different

Tag: Vietnamese

Function: These fonts support the Vietnamese script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.

XSF-Fonts are OpenType or TrueType fonts with an excellent appearance on screen at small sizes or lo

Tag: XSF

Function: XSF-Fonts are OpenType or TrueType fonts with an excellent appearance on screen at small sizes or low resolutions – especially engineered and optimized as a response of the continuous increasing demand for exceptionally readable typefaces on computer screens using Microsoft® Windows operating systems.