Downloading and Installation

1. I purchased a font, but then I deleted the file from my hard disk. Can I download the file again?

2. I purchased a font, but the download was interrupted. What can I do?

3. What is the difference between a “Single” fonts and a “Family” font?

4. What’s the solution when exchanging documents cross-platform?

5. What happens if I install just two fonts from a bigger font family?

6. Why family and single fonts?

7. Which files need to be installed when downloading fonts from the website?

8. How do I install a font I purchased?

9. How do I manually delete the font cache in Windows?

10. FontBook displays a warning when I install an OpenType font. What’s going on?


1. I purchased a font, but then I deleted the file from my hard disk. Can I download the file again?
With us you have a lifetime download guarantee. If you deleted the font from your computer, we allow you to download the font again at any time. In order to do this please go the “My Account” area and click “Show previous orders”. For security reasons you will be asked to enter your password. After doing so you will receive your personal order history and are able to directly download your font or have it sent to your e-mail account.



2. I purchased a font, but the download was interrupted. What can I do?
If the download of a font was interrupted, please try again. You are able to download at any time due to your lifetime download guarantee. In order to do this please go the “My Account” area and click “Show previous orders”. For security reasons you will be asked to enter your password. After doing so you will receive your personal order history and are able to directly download your font or have it sent to your e-mail account.



3. What is the difference between a “Single” fonts and a “Family” font?
Most of the fonts from Linotype are arranged in Mac OS and/or Windows either as “families” or as “single fonts, ” independent of whether you are using PostScript, TrueType or OpenType format fonts.

Family font:
A family font is part of a group of fonts, whose styles (e.g., Roman, Italic, Bold and Bold-Italic) are linked together. Clicking the according style button will load the appropriate font.
Unlike on the Macintosh, font styles are classified in “families” under Windows.
A type family can contain a maximum of four members - e.g. “Regular”, “Italic”, “Bold” and “Bold Italic”. One of these is specified as the default font. Only this default font appears in the Font menus of application programs. The three other variations are linked to the default font and are only activated by selecting the font styles “Italic”, “Bold” and “Bold Italic”.

Single font:
Fonts that do not have links to other fonts and appear separately in the font menu of applications are called “single” fonts. Styles (italic, bold, etc) may be applied, but these will be generated electronically through the application, and may vary in appearance to “true” italics or bolds. It is always advisable to have the correct italics and bolds installed to prevent unwanted, poor-looking renderings on screen, or in print.

Attention:
“Family” and “Single” fonts are treated differently on the Mac OS and Windows operating systems. When installing only one member of a linked font family in Windows, the name of the base font will appear in the font menu (e.g., Frutiger Roman), independently if you have installed a non-base font (e.g., Frutiger Bold).
On Macintosh systems all installed fonts are listed in the applications font menu, contrary to Windows applications. But if you have purchased only parts of the font family (e.g., Frutiger Bold), only this particular font can be used correctly.


Using “Family” and “Single” fonts
On Windows systems it is very common to select the desired font from the font menu of your application and then apply a style to it (e.g., italic or bold). If you install single fonts and you choose to activate a style, e.g., italic, via the style menu, your application will italicize the text automatically. Depending on your software and printer equipment, outputs can be of different quality. For instance, while some printers print out the “false” italics or bolds, others do not print correctly at all. Therefore, you should install family fonts when using Windows.

Mac OS organises fonts differently in applications. Usually Macintosh users will activate the desired font styles directly without using the style buttons, because all members of the font family appear in the font menu. The major problem is when work files, which are produced on the Mac, are exchanged with Windows. Since Mac users activate the styles directly and Windows users in majority use style buttons, the document created on the Mac will not be recognized on Windows. The same thing happens when exchanging file from Windows to Mac.



4. What’s the solution when exchanging documents cross-platform?
When exchanging work files cross-platform it is always advisable to do the following:

1. Use the same fonts from the same font vendor for MacOS and Windows. There are various versions of fonts available (e.g., Officina, Helvetica, Rotis, etc). Mixing old and new fonts will result in chaos.
2. Use the most current version of the fonts to minimize incompatibility with hardware and software, as well as to receive a product that is produced according to current production guidelines for fonts.
3. Use either just family fonts, or just single fonts. If you decide upon using family fonts, then you should work using the style buttons on the Mac. This will assure that the file can be opened correctly on the PC. When using single fonts, be sure not to use the styles. Instead activate the fonts directly from the font menu.
4. Never install family and single fonts at the same time!



5. What happens if I install just two fonts from a bigger font family?
Depending on which operating system you are using there are several things to be aware of:

Macintosh:
If you install the family version of the two fonts (e.g., roman and bold), you will receive one suitcase plus two printer files and two *.afm files. Included in the suitcase are the bitmaps for all four members of the font family. Still, all four fonts that are part of the family appear in the font menu. Now, if you select italic or bold italic for printing, the screen display and print will not look smooth because of the missing printer font files, while roman and bold look smooth because the printer fonts are included. Install the single fonts if you would like to have the fonts available in your application, which have the accompanying printer fonts.

Windows:
When using Windows, unlike the Macintosh only the base font will appear in the font menu. You can select all styles (italic, bold, bold italic), although only the bold is “true” and not electronically generated.



6. Why family and single fonts?
Linotype offers both family and single fonts. Some of our clients only need a single font from a specific font family for a project in which they are involved. Therefore Linotype sells the majority of its font products on a “per-weight-basis.” This saves cost for the customer.



7. Which files need to be installed when downloading fonts from the website?
When downloading fonts from the Linotype webshop, they will arrive packaged in *.zip files. These need to be extracted using StuffIt Expander (Macintosh), or Winzip (Windows). After extracting the file LT_xx-123.zip you will find the following items:

Documents – This is folder where the License agreement and Trademark files are stored
Fonts – Find the actual purchased font files here
html – This folder contains accompanying files for Readme.html
Readme.html – This file includes extra information on the downloaded files

Have a look inside the “Fonts” folder. When the fonts folder is opened, the following items will be viewable, depending on the purchase:

Mac/PC PS Family – This folder includes the family oriented fonts
Mac/PC PS Single – This folder includes the single fonts
Mac/PC TT Family – This folder includes the family oriented fonts
Mac/PC TT Single – This folder includes the single fonts
OT/Family – This folder includes the family oriented fonts
OT/Single – This folder includes the single fonts

Depending on which fonts you choose to install, the appearance in the font menu will vary as explained above.



8. How do I install a font I purchased?
If you are using Windows, proceed as follows: Download the zip file and extract it. Place the font file (you’ll notice it has the *.otf ending) on your desktop and open your operating system’s font folder. Drag and drop the font file from your desktop into the font folder. Now, when you start your application, your font will be displayed in the font menu. If you are using a Mac, it depends on which font management system you use. If you are not using Font Manager, but rather the supplied FontBook, install the font file as follows: Download the zip file and extract it. Place the font file (you’ll notice the *.otf ending) on your desktop and double click it. Select “Install font” and start your application – the font should now be displayed in the font menu.



9. How do I manually delete the font cache in Windows?
Normally, you will find the font cache under C:\Programs\Common Files\Adobe\TypeSpt – if not, search your hard drive for a file named AdobeFnt*. Simply delete this file. However, you cannot delete the files by the name of AdobeFnt.db or FontNames.db. These are not cache files. Make sure that no Adobe program is running while you do this.

You will find the system caches here – you should delete these, as well:
Windows NT, 2000, XP and Vista, Win 7 and Win 8
C:\WINDOWS\system32\FNTCACHE.DAT

Windows 95, 98, and Me
C:\WINDOWS\ttfCache



10. FontBook displays a warning when I install an OpenType font. What’s going on?
FontBook often shows warning or error messages when you try to install a font that contains too much information about how a character is designed. This doesn’t seem to have any effects – if a font is installed, it will work. Additional features that FontBook does not have are listed by other applications that do work with them, e.g. Adobe CS. One example of a so-called problem font for FontBook is Palatino. It has a range of additional information that FontBook cannot import without issue and therefore displays an error message.