High Noon Value Pack

Available as Value Pack for instant download

Five high-class fonts in the Wild West style that everyone can afford for only .

Our High Noon Value Pack has been carefully pieced together by Linotype’s type experts, creating a complete palette of period feeling for one low price. The fonts are all reminiscent of the big wood typefaces that were used for posters and advertising in 19th Century America. Because of their historical pedigree, these five fonts should all be used in large point sizes and for display applications.


These typefaces are included in the High Noon Value Pack:

Cottonwood™ is a group effort of the typeface artists K.B. Chansler, B. Lind and J. Redick and displays the unmistakable look of the Wild West. It is stylistically modelled on the typefaces used in advertisements and signage toward the end of the 19th century. Typical for these capital alphabets are the split serifs which emphasize the markedly decorative character. Cottonwood is a kind of homage to the Western typefaces (woodtypes) which became popular through their use on Wanted signs in Western films. Cottonwood is best used sparingly in headlines to best emphasize its decorative, ’wild’ character.

Mesquite™ is a narrow Tuscan-style typeface designed at Adobe in 1990. Like older Tuscans from the 19th Century, Mesquite has elaborate, creative serif treatments—although the serifs are so unique that it is difficult to call them serifs anymore, they are more like pointy finials. A convex–concave–convex ornamental feature appears on the middle of each vertical and diagonal stroke. Together with the “serifs” at the tops and bottoms of each stroke, this feature creates a “tri-band” pattern over text set in Mesquite. Mesquite is not a text face. Aside from its narrowness and decorative qualities, Mesquite has no lowercase. The font’s uppercase glyphs have been directly copied and placed in the lowercase range.

Old Town No. 536™ is a homage to the old woodtypes. These became especially popular through their use on wanted posters in Wild West films. Adrian Frutiger also designed his typeface Westside in this style. Due to its robust figures, Old Town No. 536 is particularly effective when used in headlines. It belongs stylistically to the Italienne typefaces, whose serifs are thicker than the strokes.

Rosewood™ was created by the designer trio K.B. Chansler, C. Crossgrove and C. Twombly, and has its roots in the slab serif style. The first weight displays the simplicity typical of display typefaces at the end of the 18th century. The other weights are playful variations on this theme. The tendency toward display and ornametal typefaces began with the English Industrial Revolution. The introduction of new machines made mass production possible in the print industry, a technique meant to constantly produce new and unusual products to sell to more and more consumers. Many of the typefaces created in this time were meant simply to catch attention and to advertise products. The two ornamental weights of Rosewood reflect this tendency and never fail to catch the reader’s eye. Rosewood is a bicolor font, meaning that the weight Rosewood fill can be used as a decoration for the inner spaces of Rosewood regular.

Janet Murphy design ITC Wild West™ in 1997. A symbol font containing all of the cowboy-like pictograms one could ever need, ITC Wild West Pi includes such symbols as a ten-gallon hat, horseshoes, revolvers, and steer skulls.


Order the High Noon Fonts as Value Pack for instant download.

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