Art Deco Value Pack

Available as Value Pack for instant download

5 fascinating fonts in the style of Art Deco at once for only .

The Art Deco era was a period of rebirth and discovery in the world of the arts and design. Just in time for spring, we’ve bundled together five Art Deco fonts into one low-priced Value Pack. The package includes the Arnold Boecklin™, ITC Rennie Mackintosh™ and ITC Manhattan™ – three fonts based on some of the of the most popular type styles used during the Art Deco era. Plus, Auriol® Black and ITC Benguiat® – two additional interpretations of the spirit of this age – are also included.


These typefaces are included in the Art Deco Value Pack:

Arnold Boecklin appeared in 1904 with the font foundry Otto Weisert. Traces of the floral forms of the Jugendstil can still be seen in this typeface. Alphabets of this type were mainly meant for larger point sizes, as on posters. A decorative feel was much more important than legibility and Arnold Boecklin was of particular importance to the book design of the Jugendstil movement. Today the font is often used to remind people of ’the good old days’.

Auriol was designed by Georges Auriol, born Jean Georges Huyot, in the early 20th century. Auriol was a French graphic artist whose work exemplified the art nouveau style of Paris in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1900, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, who was widely acclaimed for his highly original buildings, interiors and furniture produced at the turn of the twentieth century in Glasgow. This font family includes two weights, bold and light, each with alternate characters, as well as an ornament font with many Jugendstil decorations. The bold is very close in weight to Mackintosh’s actual lettering, and the light was developed for legibility at smaller point sizes. This family is quirky, unusual, and delightfully clever; a good choice for product packaging, advertising, and graphic designs with a period flair.

A roman face designed in the early 1980s by Ed Benguiat for ITC, ITC Benguiat shows a strong Art Nouveau influence. As with ITC Korinna®, the stress of the ITC Benguiat font family occurs in the upper half of each capital. This distinctive typeface is particularly useful for display and advertising work.

ITC Manhattan was designed in 1970 for ITC by Tom Carnase, who also created ITC Avant Garde Gothic®. The distinguishing characteristic of this designer’s work is found in the emphasis on the thick-thin constrast. In this case, Carnase approached the border of the impossible. The heavy vertical strokes stand opposite the finest of lines and the thick columns dominate the overall look. The basic forms are strictly constructed, as are those of Morris F. Benton’s Broadway of 1925, to which many parallels can be found. Manhattan is best used for applications which will not be placed too far from the viewer, as at too great a distance the fine lines can no longer be seen. It should be used exclusively for headlines in medium point sizes.

ITC Rennie Mackintosh was designed in 1996 by Phill Grimshaw, and is the result of research and collaboration between the International Typeface Corporation and the Glasgow School of Art. The letterforms are based on the handwriting and drawings of Scottish designer Charles Rennie Mackintosh, who was widely acclaimed for his highly original buildings, interiors and furniture produced at the turn of the twentieth century in Glasgow. This font family includes two weights, bold and light, each with alternate characters, as well as an ornament font with many Jugendstil decorations. The bold is very close in weight to Mackintosh’s actual lettering, and the light was developed for legibility at smaller point sizes. This family is quirky, unusual, and delightfully clever; a good choice for product packaging, advertising, and graphic designs with a period flair.


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