Linotype TypoTechnica 2005

Matthew Carter | Bruno Steinert | David Lemon | Christopher Slye | Theodore Harrison | Yuri Yarmola | Adam Twardoch | Rich Roat | Tal Leming & Erik van Blokland | Atilla Korap | Paul Nelson | Scott Wieseler & Gavin Drake | John Hudson | Nadine Chahine | Aamir Wali | Johannes Bergerhausen | Clive Bruton | Thomas Merz | Thomas Caldwell
Matthew Carter
Matthew Carter

Matthew Carter

Cone Type Inc.

A close-up view of type

This talk tries to answer the question I am most frequently asked: why new typefaces? I discuss a number of recent typeface designs of differing origins and purposes to explain how they came into existence. Some were designed speculatively (Mantinia), some were commissioned by clients (Walker, Fenway), some were undertaken to solve technical problems (Verdana, Georgia). These case histories add up to an overview of the practice of a contemporary type designer.
Carter is a type designer with fifty years experience of typographic technologies ranging from hand-cut punches to computer fonts. His company, Carter & Cone Type, has produced types for Time, Newsweek, Wired, U.S. News & World Report, Sports Illustrated, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, The Walker Art Center, the Museum of Modern Art, and Yale University. For Microsoft, Carter designed the screen fonts Verdana, Tahoma, Nina and Georgia.
Bruno Steinert
Bruno Steinert

Bruno Steinert

Linotype GmbH

Digital Rights Management (DRM)
A pragmatic approach to Digital Rights Management

Bruno Steinert is the managing director of Linotype GmbH. He joined the company in 1973 and developed the initial strategies for Mac-based products such as color systems and the LinoPress newspaper system. In 1997 Bruno set up a separate company, Linotype GmbH, a fully owned subsidiary of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG.
David Lemon
David Lemon

David Lemon

Adobe Systems, Inc.

The Future of Fonts

Just as metal type soon went beyond an emulation of calligraphy, computer-based typography has gone beyond emulating metal type. Todays fonts support the added power of digital text, and contain increasingly sophisticated layout information. These features rely on a deepening partnership between fonts, applications and operating systems. David Lemon will discuss this evolving world, with a focus on the technologies related to OpenType.
As a painting student in the early 1970s, David Lemon fell in love with type as a perfect blend of art and technology, so he switched to studying graphic design. After graduation, David worked for several magazines and newspapers. He used their computer typesetting systems, and continued to study the esthetics and technology of type. When the Apple LaserWriter came out, he read about PostScript, and learned that Adobe had a calligrapher running its type group. He visited Sumner Stone, and showed his designs. Soon Sumner hired David to help Adobe turn typefaces into font software. At Adobe, David became an expert in Type 1 font development, then multiple master fonts, and eventually helped direct the development of OpenType layout. As manager for the Adobe type team, David continues to work for the synergy of art and technology.
Christopher Slye
Christopher Slye

Christopher Slye

Adobe Systems, Inc.

The charms and challenges of OpenType feature authoring

OpenType "features" -- the common name for OpenTypes glyph substitution and positioning capabilities -- are one of the most appealing and compelling aspects of the OpenType font format. Adobe Systems feature file syntax, adapted by FontLab and used by many font developers today, offers a flexible and comprehensive solution for OpenType feature authoring. Adobes Christopher Slye will discuss his six years of experience with feature file authoring for Adobes western fonts, showing and explaining many examples of feature file code from Adobes OpenType fonts, and discussing the challenges and pitfalls that
are often confronted during font feature development
Christopher Slye is a native of the San Francisco Bay Area. After studying Art History at the University of California at Santa Cruz, he was inspired by the first designs from the Adobe Originals program in the late 1980s. He studied type design and type history while continuing to work as a graphic designer, eventually producing the text family Elmhurst for Font Bureau and consulting for type-related companies such as Monotype and MvB Design. Christopher joined the typographic staff at Adobe in 1997, where he has helped to expand the design and functionality of Adobe Originals typefaces, including Myriad and Tekton. Today, he continues to assist with design and production of Adobes growing library of typefaces in OpenType format.
Theodore Harrison
Theodore Harrison

Theodore Harrison

FontLab Ltd.

The Electronic EULA

The EULAs for most fonts still exist in a static, inaccessible form - difficult to understand and impossible to update. We believe that this causes unnecessary hindrance to font commerce, reducing the value of fonts and impeding proper licensing. The solution is the electronic
EULA - contained within the font; easily accessible to users; updatable by font vendors; and succinctly summarized for ease of understanding. We will show the current development of the electronic EULA concept and demonstrate an application using it.
Ted Harrison is the president of Fontlab - the foremost developer of typography software in the world.
Yuri Yarmola
Yuri Yarmola

Yuri Yarmola

FontLab Ltd.

Workshop Computer Lab

Adam Twardoch
Adam Twardoch

Adam Twardoch

FontLab Ltd.

Workshop Computer Lab

Rich Roat
Rich Roat

Rich Roat

House Industries

Photo-Lettering: Back to the Future

House Industries purchased the what remained of the Photo-Lettering display type collection in 2003. They have since partnered with dutch type master and visionary Erik van Blokland and prolific designer Christian Schwartz to revive the collection and create a new portal for
vending the timeless classics as well as new creations. Rich Roat describes how the PLINC partnership will combine the timeless creativity of the original PLINC contributing artists with a modern technology to make some of the more unique elements of the collection
available again.
Rich Roat and his partner, Andy Cruz founded House Industries in 1993 as a graphic design/illustration studio. In early 1994, the company entered the typography marketplace with 12 questionable fonts and some every effective marketing materials. House has since grown into a studio which sells theme-based font kits, illustration and design services and, most recently, clothing and accessories.
Tal Leming
Tal Leming
Erik van Blokland
Erik van Blokland

Tal Leming (House Industries) & Erik van Blokland (LettError Type)

1. Introduction to Scripting with RoboFab
2. More Scripting with RoboFab
3. RoboFab Show, Tell and Ask

Introduction to Scripting with RoboFab

RoboFab is a robust, Python based scripting package that works both within FontLab and in pure Python. In this session we will introduce RoboFab and its relatives the UFO and the GLIF, explain the various environments that RoboFab operates in and work through some basic scripts.

More Scripting with RoboFab


This session will focus on RoboFab scripts for production related activities. Topics to be covered include working with multiple fonts, kerning, interpolation and generating fonts.

RoboFab Show, Tell and Ask


RoboFab provides designers not only with a robust scripting platform.
It also serves as a code base for the development of small type design tools. This session will introduce some of the tools developed with RoboFab including Superpolator and MetricsMachine.

Half of the session will be available for questions, answers and various discussions that might come up

Tal Leming is a designer and programmer at House Industries. In his spare time he is a co-developer of RoboFab and the author of several tools for type design, including MetricsMachine, a sophisticated metrics editor.
Atilla Korap
Atilla Korap

Atilla Korap

Linotype GmbH

Workshop Computer Lab

Paul Nelson
Paul Nelson

Paul Nelson

Microsoft

Longhorn, Avalon, Office and OpenType

This presentation will give an overview of the OpenType support that is coming with the next round of Microsoft products.
Paul will give an explanation of Avalon (what it is and is not) and demonstration of Avalon text support. An overview of the Typography properties and an explanation of why they are designed in the way they are
Paul Nelson is the Program Manager at Microsoft Typography responsible for the Longhorn typographic support. He has been working with OpenType for over 10 years, having made the first Arabic OpenType (TrueType Open) fonts in November 1994. Paul has been instrumental in increasing the number of languages supported by Windows and getting better OpenType support into the Windows OS.
Gavin Drake
Gavin Drake
Scott Wieseler
Scott Wieseler

Gavin Drake & Scott Wieseler

Quark, Inc.

QuarkXPress and OpenType

QuarkXPress, the industry standard in professional page layout, will soon be adding Unicode™ and OpenType support. Visit this session to find out more about what this means for QuarkXPress and the enhancements this will bring.
Gavin took on his current role as UK Marketing Director for Quark in 2004, driving forward the radical changes that have taken place at Quark over the last 12 months as the company continues to get closer to its customers, helping them create, manage, personalise, and distribute content to a variety of media formats and devices at low cost.

After earning his BFA from Colorado State University in graphic design and photography, Scott managed a photography lab and worked as a typesetter and QuarkXPress trainer. He joined the quality assurance team at Quark Inc. in 1998 and began work as a product analyst on the QuarkXPress product management team two years ago.
John Hudson
John Hudson

John Hudson

Tiro Typeworks

How to get the most out of MS VOLT

This presentation presumes some familiarity with Microsoft’s free Visual OpenType Layout Tool, its purpose, user interface and basic functionality. John Hudson discusses FontLab-to-VOLT workflow issues and how to manage them, and provides a detailed explanation of VOLT project and lookup text sources and shows how to edit them, and shows some tricks and tips for lookup formatting. Finally, he will explain the functionality of the new kerning converter command line tool, and demonstrate how to use it.
John Hudson is a type designer and co-founder, with Ross Mills, of Tiro Typeworks. He specialises in the design and manufacture of fonts for multilingual computing and publishing, and has made types for the Arabic, Cyrillic, Ethiopic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin,
Ogham, and Thai scripts. Tiro’s clients include Microsoft, Adobe, Apple and Linotype, as well as many smaller companies and scholarly communities. In addition to his type design activities, John writes and lectures on font technology issues
Nadine Chahine
Nadine Chahine

Nadine Chahine

Linotype GmbH

Unchained: Arabic typography with an Open flavour

For many years the development of Arabic typography has been dictated by the tension between the limitations and breakthroughs in technology. The context sensitive forms, the large character set, the add-on vocalization, and the right-to-left direction have all been extra „luggage“ that type designers and printers had to deal with. With the advancement of Opentype technology, such issues are now fully supported and easy to deal with. It is also possible to fully represent Arabic calligraphy with all its variations and complexity of forms. The question that remains is: If technology is no longer a barrier against the proper representation of Arabic calligraphy, what form should Arabic typography take, and what function? Where can one look for inspiration, and what model can a type designer follow?
Nadine Chahine is a recent graduate from the University of Reading, with an MA in Typeface Design. During her study at Reading, she focused on the design of a harmonious family of Arabic and Latin fonts. Her interest in Arabic typography started during her second year at the Graphic Design program at the American University of Beirut. She teaches Arabic typography as a visiting lecturer at the American University in Dubai and is currently working at Linotype, Germany.
Aamir Wali
Aamir Wali

Aamir Wali

National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, Lahore Pakistan

Contextual Substitution in Nafees Nastaliq Script

With 60 million speakers in more than 20 countries, Urdu is a widely spoken language, especially in South Asia (www.ethnologue.com). It has a rich tradition of poetry and prose. Traditionally, Urdu has been written in Nastaliq script. This script is cursive having a complex and context-sensitive structure. Though it is defined by well-formed rules passed down through generations of calligraphers, these rules have not been quantitatively examined and published in enough detail to enable modeling of character-based Nastaliq font for computers.
In my presentation I will first introduce the audience to the context sensitive behavior of Nastaliq. Then I will formulate context sensitive substitution rules for a subset of Nastaliq and finally explain how these rules can be modeled using the current technology. More emphasis will be on the first part.
Mr. Aamir Wali did his bachelor’s degree in Computer Sciences from National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, Lahore2002 and MS in Computer Science from the same university 2004. He is a lecturer and faculty member in Center for Research in Urdu Language Processing at National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences, Lahore Pakistan. Since then he has been doing R&D in script processing of Urdu. His works include 1) incorporating OpenType GSUB Table 8 into Linux’s rendering engine Pango and 2) OpenType fonts for Urdu such as Nafees Nastaliq, Nafees Naskh and Nafees Pakistani Naskh.
Johannes Bergerhausen
Johannes Bergerhausen

Johannes Bergerhausen

University of Applied Sciences in Mainz

decodeunicode – the open science database

Closely following the DNA, the ASCII-Code ranks amoung the most successful codes on
this planet. Now, Unicode is taking its place.
With this encoding system, millions of typographic laypersons have access to a huge character repertoire right on their keyboard. More often than not, however, they are unaware of these treasures. Now is the right time to gather and explain the history, the various meanings and correct typographic use of each Unicode character. Who “invented” the full stop? When did the Infinity sign come into being? What’s an Ogonek?
The advent of Unicode is a technical revolution. Even more so, however, it marks a cultural one.In a research project in the department of Design at the University of Applied Sciences in Mainz, Germany, we are collecting images, texts and information about each and every Unicode character.In April 2005, the project will be opened for anyone to submit their own material to the open science database. In his lecture, Prof. Bergerhausen will give a short introduction to code-history from Telex to Unicode and will present the project. The project is supported by the Germany Federal Ministry of Education and Research.

Prof. Johannes Bergerhausen, born 1965, studied communication design at the University of Applied Sciences in Düsseldorf, Germany. Worked in Paris
1993 – 2000 first with Grapus founders Gérard Paris-Clavel and Pierre Bernard, then free-lancing. Received a grant in 1998 from the French Centre National des Arts Plastiques, Paris, for a research project in typography on the ASCII code. Guest lectures at Amiens, Paris, Prague, Rotterdam, Warsaw and Weimar. Back in Germany since 2000, office in Cologne. 2000 – 2002 lecturer at the University of Applied Sciences in Düsseldorf. Since 2002, professor of typography at the Department of Design at the University of Applied Sciences in Mainz. contact: bergerhausen@fh-mainz.de
Clive Bruton
Clive Bruton

Clive Bruton

Customer data on the fly

A practical demonstration of font customisation, for example the name of the purchaser and their address, on a per-customer basis. With a desktop application to display such information to any end user.
Clive Bruton is a designer and typographer with a particular interest in technology. His favourite subject is the automation of workflows using scripts and databases, while still maintaining high design and typographic values. He studied typography at the London College of Printing, runs the web-based magazine Fontzone.com and occasionally writes for other publications or speaks on the subject of intellectual property.
Thomas Merz
Thomas Merz

Thomas Merz

PDFlib GmbH

Fonts in PDF – selected topics (and FontReporter plugin presentation)

Talking about fonts in PDF could easily fill a multi-day workshop.
In this session I’ll expand on a few selected topics, including the following:

* Supported font formats in PDF, and how they relate to input font formats
* Font-related rules and restrictions in PDF/X and PDF/A (these are ISO standards for PDF in prepress and archiving)
* Extended support for OpenType font embedding in PDF 1.6/Acrobat 7
* Knowing your glyphs by name, or how typographers can seriously spoil text extract from PDF (but shouldn’t)
* Recommended Acrobat plugins for dealing with fonts in PDF, including the free FontReporter, a new Acrobat plugin by PDFlib GmbH.


Thomas Merz is founder and president of PDFlib GmbH, a PDF software development company in Munich, Germany.
Their PDFlib product line is the premier cross-platform and cross-language software for processing PDF. PDFlib is available since 1997, and has tens of thousands of users worldwide. One of PDFlib’s major features is its text engine with strong font, encoding, and Unicode support.

Thomas Merz wrote several books on PostScript, fonts, and Acrobat/PDF. He also is a frequent speaker at international conferences. Thomas received a master degree in mathematics and computer science in 1990.

Thomas Merz can be reached at tm@pdflib.com.
Thomas Caldwell
Thomas Caldwell

Thomas Caldwell

Linotype GmbH

Fonts Designed for the Expanded European Union

With the expansion of the European Union in 2004 ten countries joined the existing fifteen. There are 20 official languages that are spoken and written in the 25 countries. In this talk we will see how the predominant 256 character font no longer meets the rather simple need of writing text across European boarders. Starting with the traditional Type 1 and TrueType font we will move on to better ways of covering the language requirements in a font and compare the different methods and types of fonts available today. The existing font solutions will be compared and measured by their ability to support the official and national languages. Weakness and strength of each solution will be shown and discussed where necessary. For each solution we also need to take a good look at the result produced by the application. The font solution is only as good as the application support available for the multiple languages. Where do the applications fail to support certain solutions and what can we do to work around the problems if changing the application is not an option? Finally we will also go into some detail of what to observe when migrating text that uses existing fonts to new font formats.
Thomas Caldwell has been with Linotype since 1991. For the last five years he has been responsible for font development, involved in improving the workflow in font production, project manager for the implementation of an ISO 9001:2000 quality management system for Linotype and dedicated to the continuing expansion of the font Library to support additional languages in new OpenType fonts.