DIN Next™ Devanagari font family


Designed by Kimya Gandhi in 2012
Akira Kobayashi in 2012
DIN Next is a typeface family inspired by the classic industrial German engineering designs, DIN 1451 Engschrift and Mittelschrift. Akira Kobayashi began by revising these two faces-who names just mean condensed" and "regular"-before expanding them into a new family with seven weights (Light to Black). Each weight ships in three varieties: Regular, Italic, and Condensed, bringing the total number of fonts in the DIN Next family to 21. DIN Next is part of Linotype's Platinum Collection.Linotype has been supplying its customers with the two DIN 1451 fonts since 1980. Recently, they have become more popular than ever, with designers regularly asking for additional weights.The abbreviation "DIN" stands for "Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V.," which is the German Institute for Industrial Standardization. In 1936 the German Standard Committee settled upon DIN 1451 as the standard font for the areas of technology, traffic, administration and business. The design was to be used on German street signs and house numbers. The committee wanted a sans serif, thinking it would be more legible, straightforward, and easy to reproduce. They did not intend for the design to be used for advertisements and other artistically oriented purposes. Nevertheless, because DIN 1451 was seen all over Germany on signs for town names and traffic directions, it became familiar enough to make its way onto the palettes of graphic designers and advertising art directors. The digital version of DIN 1451 would go on to be adopted and used by designers in other countries as well, solidifying its worldwide design reputation.There are many subtle differences in DIN Next's letters when compared withe DIN 1451 original. These were added by Kobayashi to make the new family even more versatile in 21st-century media. For instance, although DIN 1451's corners are all pointed angles, DIN Next has rounded them all slightly. Even this softening is a nod to part of DIN 1451's past, however. Many of the signs that use DIN 1451 are cut with routers, which cannot make perfect corners; their rounded heads cut rounded corners best. Linotype's DIN 1451 Engschrift and Mittelschrift are certified by the German DIN Institute for use on official signage projects. Since DIN Next is a new design, these applications within Germany are not possible with it. However, DIN Next may be used for any other project, and it may be used for industrial signage in any other country! DIN Next has been tailored especially for graphic designers, but its industrial heritage makes it surprisingly functional in just about any application.
The DIN Next family has been extended with seven arabic weights and five Devanagari weights. The display of the Devanagari fonts on the website does not show all features of the font and therefore not all language features may be displayed correctly"

किसी जाति का जीवन तथा इन

DIN Next Devanagari














Technical details
OpenType outline flavour:
TTF - TrueType-Outlines
Technical font names:
File name: DINNextDevanagariStd-Bold.ttf
Windows menu name: DIN Next Devanagari Std Regular
PostScript name: DINNextDevanagariStd-Bold
PostScript full name: DIN Next Devanagari Std Bold
Catalog number:
168417251
Characters:
1382
US$ 99
Add to cart

Features

Languages

Localized Forms

Tag: locl

Function: Many scripts used to write multiple languages over wide geographical areas have developed localized variant forms of specific letters, which are used by individual literary communities. For example, a number of letters in the Bulgarian and Serbian alphabets have forms distinct from their Russian counterparts and from each other. In some cases the localized form differs only subtly from the script 'norm', in others the forms are radically distinct. This feature enables localized forms of glyphs to be substituted for default forms. The user applies this feature to text to enable localized Bulgarian forms of Cyrillic letters; alternatively, the feature might enable localized Russian forms in a Bulgarian manufactured font in which the Bulgarian forms are the default characters.

Stylistic Alternates

Tag: salt

Function: Many fonts contain alternate glyph designs for a purely esthetic effect; these don't always fit into a clear category like swash or historical. As in the case of swash glyphs, there may be more than one alternate form. This feature replaces the default forms with the stylistic alternates. The user applies this feature to Industria to get the alternate form of g.

Above-Base Substitutions

Tag: abvs

Function: Substitutes a ligature for a base glyph and mark that's above it. In complex scripts like Kannada (Indic), the vowel sign for the vowel I which a mark, is positioned above base consonants. This mark combines with the consonant Ga to form a ligature.

Akhands

Tag: akhn

Function: Preferentially substitutes a sequence of characters with a ligature. This substitution is done irrespective of any characters that may precede or follow the sequence. In complex scripts like Devanagari (Indic), the sequence Ka, Halant, Ssa should always produce the ligature Kssa, irrespective of characters that precede/follow the above given sequence. The Kssa is identified in Devanagari as an Akhand character (meaning unbreakable).

Below-Base Forms

Tag: blwf

Function: Substitutes the below-base form of a consonant in conjuncts. In complex scripts like Oriya (Indic), the consonant Va has a below-base form that is used to generate conjuncts. Given a sequence Gha, Virama (Halant), Va; the below-base form of Va would be substituted to form the conjunct GhVa.

Below-Base Substitutions

Tag: blws

Function: Produces ligatures that comprise of base glyph and below-base forms. In the Malayalam script (Indic), the conjunct Kla, requires a ligature which is formed using the base glyph Ka and the below-base form of consonant La. This feature can also be used to substitute ligatures formed using base glyphs and below base matras in Indic scripts.

Conjunct Forms

Tag: cjct

Function: This feature allows for control over re-ordering of reph and pre-pended matras in case of consonants that do not take half forms yet do form conjunct ligatures in combination with certain following consonants.

Half Forms

Tag: half

Function: Produces the half forms of consonants in Indic scripts. In Hindi (Devanagari script), the conjunct KKa, obtained by doubling the Ka, is denoted with a half form of Ka followed by the full form.

Nukta Forms

Tag: nukt

Function: Produces Nukta forms in Indic scripts. In Hindi (Devanagari script), a consonant when combined with a nukta gives its nukta form.

Pre-base Substitutions

Tag: pres

Function: Produces the pre-base forms of conjuncts in Indic scripts. It can also be used to substitute the appropriate glyph variant for pre-base vowel signs. In the Gujarati (Indic) script, the doubling of consonant Ka requires the first Ka to be substituted by its pre-base form. This in turn ligates with the second Ka. Applying this feature would result in the ligaturised version of the doubled Ka.

Rakar Forms

Tag: rkrf

Function: Produces conjoined forms for consonants with rakar in Devanagari and Gujarati scripts.

Reph Form

Tag: rphf

Function: Substitutes the Reph form for a consonant and halant sequence. In the Devanagari (Indic) script, the consonant Ra possesses a reph form. When the Ra is a syllable initial consonant and is followed by the virama, it is repositioned after the post base vowel sign within the syllable, and also substituted with a mark that sits above the base glyph.

Vattu Variants

Tag: vatu

Function: Substitutes ligatures for conjuncts made up of base consonants with consonants that have vattu forms. In the Devanagari (Indic) script, the consonant Ra takes a vattu form, when it is not the syllable initial consonant in a conjunct. This form ligates with the base consonant as well as half forms of consonants.

These fonts support the Indic script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different form

Tag: Indic

Function: These fonts support the Indic script. Each font is Unicode™ encoded, and available in different formats. Please review the product information for each font to ensure it will meet your requirements.

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Tag: Devanagari

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Tag: Belle Auto

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Tag: Screen optimized